DONATE TO OUR CURRENT FUNDRAISING PROJECT


ECU Melanoma Research Group – the Multiplex Test Kit

This project expands on the success of the tests developed using the Droplet Digital PCR machine (Phase 1 – the earlier $135,000 funding project) and making them more widely available to the general community of melanoma sufferers, to not only improve the monitoring of patients for disease spread, but also to test for melanoma at its earliest stages in suspicious moles. Ultimately Phase 2 will enable development of a multiplex kit combining several Droplet Digital PCR tests into one easy kit that can be used for routine testing of all melanomas and to personalise treatment decisions,. Once validated, the companion Droplet Digital PCR test will be commercialised and translated into the clinic in collaboration with Pathology and biotechnology companies for the testing of over 1000 new patients per year.

Given Melanoma is the sixth most common cause of cancer related death in Australian men and tenth most common in Australian women, chances are, you have known a person who has had a Melanoma or needed Melanoma treatment. To be able to offer those in need a significantly improved melanoma test and improved treatment success is truly an unmet medical need, in a country with one of the highest rates of skin cancer in the world. Together we can save many lives in our own community – maybe even your own.

The Role of Rotary Clubs

Led by the Rotary Club of Bay View Claremont, Rotary Clubs in Western Australia have come together to support this incredible world class research led by Professor Mel Ziman.  Our role is to assist in the development of a Multiplex Test Kit combining several Droplet Digital PCR tests into one easy kit that can be used for routine testing of all melanomas and to personalise treatment decisions and to save lives in our community.

ecuimages

ABOUT MELANOMA

WHY WE PASSIONATELY CARE

Rotary Bayview Claremont (Western Australia) initiated this Rotary for Melanoma site to help coordinate fundraising efforts of Rotary Clubs in Australia, working with leading medical researchers and health practitioners dedicated to Melanoma research.

Australia has the highest rate of skin cancer in the world, and Melanoma research has a direct link to the well-being of Australian families. We believe it is a critical cause.

Melanoma is the sixth most common cause of cancer related cause of death in Australian men and tenth most common in Australian women. Chances are, you have known a person who has needed Melanoma treatment. It is close to our hearts too.

MELANOMA FACTS


ZimanTeam

ECU’s Melanoma Research Group

  • Australia has the highest rate of skin cancer in the world;
  • In 2010,  11,405 new cases of melanoma were diagnosed in Australia alone;
  • On average, 30 Australians will be diagnosed with melanoma every day and more than 1,200 will die from the disease each year;
  • In Australia in 2011, there were 1,544 deaths due to melanoma; and
  • Melanoma is the sixth most common cause of cancer related cause of death in Australian men and tenth most common in Australian women;
  • One person dies of melanoma every hour (every 57 minutes);
  • An estimated 10,130 people will die of melanoma in 2016;
  • Melanoma accounts for less than two percent of skin cancer cases, but the vast majority of skin cancer deaths;
  • 1 in 50 men and women will be diagnosed with melanoma of the skin during their lifetime;
  • About 86 percent of melanomas can be attributed to exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun;
  • Melanoma is one of only three cancers with an increasing mortality rate for men, along with liver cancer and esophageal cancer;
  • Survivors of melanoma are about nine times as likely as the general population to develop a new melanoma; and
  • Melanoma is the most common form of cancer for young adults 25-29 years old and the second most common form of cancer for young people 15-29 years old.

OUR LEADING AUSTRALIAN RESEARCHERS


Professor Mel Ziman, Edith Cowan University
Lab10

A Professor and Associate Dean of Edith Cowan University's School of Medical Sciences, Professor Mel Ziman is world renowned in the field of Melanoma research. She completed her PhD back in 1983, dedicating her career to melanoma research that saves lives, and contributes significantly to the community.

Leading the ECU Melanoma Research Group, Prof Ziman comes highly recommended to Rotary and we believe that supporting her research financially has a direct practical impact on the community, as well as a global imprint on the understanding of this life-threatening disease.

Her current teaching focus includes: Developmental Biology, Pharmacology, Fundamental Biomedical Techniques, and Postgraduate Supervision.

Career Background
Background

• 2013-present: Professor, School of Medical Sciences, ECU
• 2011-2013: Associate Professor, School of Medical Sciences, ECU
• 2005-2010: Associate Professor, School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Science, ECU
• 2003-2005: Senior Lecturer, School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Science, ECU
• 2001-2003: Lecturer, School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Science, ECU
• 1996-2001: Senior Research Fellowship, School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, UWA

Professional Memberships
Professional Memberships

• International Society of Differentiation (ISD)
• Australian Neuroscience Society
• Human Genetics Society of Australia
• Australian Society for Medical Research
• HERDSA
• Australian and New Zealand Society of Development and Cell Biology

• 2001-2003: Lecturer, School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Science, ECU
• 1996-2001: Senior Research Fellowship, School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, UWA

Awards and Recognition
Awards and RecognitionUniversity and National Teaching Awards
• 2008: VC Citation for excellence in development of a Teaching and Research Nexus
• 2008: Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning – Australian Learning and Teaching Council (Carrick)
• 2008: ECU Certificate of excellence in Learning and Teaching – UTEI over 85
Qualifications
Staff Qualifications

• Bachelor of Science Honours, South Africa.
• Doctor of Philosophy, South Africa, 1983 .

VOICES OF MELANOMA MEDICAL RESEARCH

Rotary Clubs may call upon the following speakers to support fund-raising events for Melanoma research.

Click on the title to see more information.


Professor Mel Ziman, ECU Melanoma Research Group
Professor Mel Ziman heads the ECU Melanoma Research Group and is world renowned in melanoma research.

Her Group is a recipient of Rotary for Melanoma research.

Professor Robert Pearce, Plastic Surgeon
Past President of Rotary Club Bayview Claremont, Professor Robert Pearce was the initiator of Rotary for Melanoma.

He is a Plastic Surgeon often removing melanoma, and is also involved in the University of Western Australia, Notre Dame University, Murdoch University, Curtin University and James Cook University.

He is completing a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree..


OUR SPONSORS OF MELANOMA RESEARCH

Thank you to the following organisations who have supported fundraising or donated to Rotary for Melanoma research:

ECU MELANOMA RESEARCH GROUP

Located at Edith Cowan University Joondalup Campus

Led by world renowned Prof Mel Ziman, the ECU Melanoma Research Group’s primary focus is to develop a simple blood test to detect circulating metastatic melanoma cells. Early identification of disease and disease spread will allow medical specialists to recommend an appropriate course of treatment at an early stage, thus improving the likelihood of treatment success.

Local and international clinicians working closely with ECU researchers are enthusiastic about the research stating that “the blood test developed by ECU researchers will revolutionise the way melanoma patients are treated”.

Their research focuses on the development of blood tests that are required to identify a group of genetic markers that are expressed in the blood of patients with melanoma, and not in the blood of healthy volunteers. Due to differences in gene expression in many melanoma cells and between patients, several markers are necessary for the accurate detection of melanoma cells in the blood.

Several state-of-the-art biochemical and molecular tools are being used to hunt for new genes which can help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms causing cancer spread. Further research is aimed at defining the most accurate set of markers for a diagnostic and prognostic blood test.

VIDEOS ABOUT OUR FUNDED RESEARCH


Watch the experience of our Phase 1 ($135,000) funded Bio Rad QX200 AutoDG Droplet Digital PCR Equipment at the ECU Melanoma Research Group.

Bio-Rad QX200 Droplet PCR system
Bio-Rad QX200 Droplet PCR system

PLEASE GET IN TOUCH